Archives for posts with tag: thesis

The review went well and I received very helpful feedback for the project.  As I proceed, I need to consider the following:

In the diagram above, I’ve identified some downtown attractions [seen in red] and they are all located within, a very walkable, 1/2 mile of the tunnel [dotted line].   I propose to re-purpose the abandoned tunnel as a distribution spine for not only bringing and dispersing people into the city, but also creating public gathering spaces such as places for events seen in the example from last year’s World Canal Conference.  In other words, how could we make it an integral part of Rochester’s civic life?  We don’t want a corridor, but a series of places where people have the opportunity to linger and connect to the rest of the city.

This early diagram illustrates the abundance of parking lots and some vacant lots throughout downtown.  They are the result of the strong single occupant car culture of today.  How can we rethink this transportation structure and change the perception of these parking spaces as potential opportunities to engage the larger network of transit and civic life.  Are there specific places [i.e. the public library] in downtown that the tunnel could connect to because of its proximity?

The above diagram is in its early stages, but begins to show a set of physical conditions of network intersections found along the western portion of the tunnel.  To the left are potential actions that could take place given the type of intersection.  After the identifying the moments of connections along the tunnel, I will need to develop spatial and operational models for interchanges that transfer people from one mode of transit to another.  Are they stairs, ramps, elevators, or any other means?  The intersections will then become a series of prototypical hubs responses to found conditions, but when read together, begins to weave a larger idea of the city and how people traverse through and interact with it.   This kit-of-parts approach allows for flexibility within the systems even though there would be a couple of unique moments for anchors or special attractions along the spine.

In addition to the conceptual development [or abstract, as seen above] of connecting the various transit networks, there is the realistic and almost scientific side to this project.  That involves the differentiation between networks because of the inherent qualities of travel speed, transit type and transit goal of each system.  How do the connections reflect these characteristics?  What other operational programs are needed at these moments?

There is much work to be done and it will be an exciting and fast-paced month ahead.

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Below is the PDF presentation I used for my mid-review.  It went well and was very helpful for me.  Next steps include investigating larger infrastructural systems and potential impacts to vacancy rates in Rochester [about 10%], making and testing a proposition for the city and a few other key goals.  There will be a lot to consider and much to investigate/explore, but that’s the fun part!

The full PDF can be downloaded here:  MIDREVIEW-presentation-sm72

I spent a little time trying to create a 3D diagram of my thesis through Grasshopper.  It’s in its early stages and should evolve into something more complex.

Thesis Web from Jie Huang on Vimeo.

To get a general sense of pattern in Rochester, I began by using the Google aerial below to generate some urban graining through Grasshopper [GH].

By using a bitmap image, GH assigns values to points based on black and white values.  From those points, a Voronoi diagram [red] is created to get the following [thin green curve = approximate subway line]:

With further GH mappings, a series of estimated influence points began to populate the subway line, creating an interesting pattern of impact:

In 1920, the Erie Canal became obsolete.  In 1921, the mayor of Rochester proposed an ordinance for the construction the subway system, which put the canal bed to use.  The proposed line extended 8.5 miles with 1.5 miles of it underground.  It ran in a northwest to southeast direction which also connected to various railways in the city.

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Lipman, Andrew D. “The Rochester Subway: Experiment in Municipal Rapid Transit,” City Historian, Vol. 36, No. 2 (April 1974), pp. 1-24.

Rochester has it all: abandoned infrastructure [rochester subway], industrial history, and post-industrial deterioration.  It seems to be the perfect fit for my investigations.

And into the tunnel we go…

This clip is part of a Special Feature from “The End of the Line — Rochester’s Subway” DVD. Music by Philip C. Carli. © 2005 Animatus Studio, all rights reserved.