Archives for posts with tag: parking

I’ve started to take a quick survey of various transportation projects, both realized and not, in an effort to get a feel of what type of physical and social intersections they possess.  They range from strict transportation interchanges to integrated shopping centers.

OMA-Barcelona Airport Terminal, 1992 competition entry

Transbay Terminal by Richard Rogers, 2007

 

Kamppi Center, Helsinki, Finland by Juhani Pallasmaa, 2001-5

This transportation center includes a central bus terminal for both local and long distance buses, metro station, freight train, parking, shopping center, and residential housing.

While these projects are too ambitious in scale for a city like Rochester, it is interesting to see what is out there and the types of formal, experiential, and social conditions they might bring to a place.

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Below is the PDF presentation I used for my mid-review.  It went well and was very helpful for me.  Next steps include investigating larger infrastructural systems and potential impacts to vacancy rates in Rochester [about 10%], making and testing a proposition for the city and a few other key goals.  There will be a lot to consider and much to investigate/explore, but that’s the fun part!

The full PDF can be downloaded here:  MIDREVIEW-presentation-sm72

The underground component of the 1.5 miles of the subway is alluring, but it is just as important to familiarize ourselves with the above ground conditions. Where might potential generative armatures begin? What will they connect?  This animated route took us by at least a few parking lots and garages.  What about the vacant lots or excessively wide streets?

These animations show further development on the Grasshopper models seen from a previous post.   By using the proximity component [in green], I am able to create an animation mapping distances among the various parking areas to each other.  This allows us to see where clusters begin to appear/form and perhaps become potential opportunities for interventions.

top view


1892 Diagram-Genesee River from Jie Huang on Vimeo.

perspective view


1892 Diagram-Genesee River from Jie Huang on Vimeo.

The field of parking lots [outlined in red and green] spread throughout downtown Rochester prompted a Grasshopper [GH] exploration on their relationships to two corridors: the abandoned subway tunnel [shorter segment] and the Genesee River [oriented north-south].

Based on the size of each parking lot [green outlines are parking garages], points are positioned from the center of each shape while its Z-value is a factor of each individual footprint.

A modified voronoi surface creates a terrain based on parking lot sizes in top and perspective views.

After creating the 3D landform, I took perpendicular sections along each corridor to describe its relationship to the distribution of parking area.  The first set of 3 images describes the conditions along the abandoned subway tunnel.

Flattening these sections would probably help illustrate more clearly the variation in area distribution or parking [potential usable] availability along the corridor.  That will be for another time.

The following 3 images are of sections along the Genesee River.

Just when you think there are too many parking lots in downtown Rochester, you find even more parking space with stacked lots.  Here is an updated diagram with the addition of parking garages [in red].  Could we use existing networks [i.e. subway, rail, river, etc] to connect these patches?

1| Clinton + Woodbury

2| Court + South

3| South btwn Main + Broad

4| Clinton + Mortimer

5| Scio + Main

6| Andrews by the Genesee River

7| Fitzhugh

8| State + Commercial

I attempted to map all the parking lots [in orange] found on Rochester’s aerial image but soon came to realize its immense scope.  I think I covered all if not most of the parking areas inside the loop and some outside.  It is a bad sign when parking dominates so much of downtown.

As a point of reference, the image below includes the same diagram from above but layered over the aerial map with highlighted vegetated [green] spaces.  What would happen if a portion of the orange becomes green?  How could we use the abandoned subway line to enliven the sea of parking?