Archives for posts with tag: city

While my project will focus more on what is indicated in orange  as the approximate area of the interchange, there will be a secondary component of the thesis at a larger urban scale. This component will begin to illustrate the beginnings of an emergent system of networks.  For this portion, I plan to use the abandoned subway tunnel [seen as red dotted line] as a distribution spine from the transit interchange.

I have been experimenting with Grasshopper to help demonstrate some distance mappings of possible routes to and from random points.  My second attempt to use the GH component “Shortest Walk” yielded some helpful results.  The idea is to visualize the existing subway tunnel as a spine that extends eastward from the interchange and towards Rochester’s downtown.  I used a measurement of 1/2 mile as the walking tolerance so see all the possible routes one would take from the tunnel path outward.  This GH definition is a simplified version of what may come in the near future.  I intend to incorporate other disruptions or attractions within the city’s downtown to model the more complex nuances of movement.

Screen shot | green = tunnel, red = suggested route, yellow = line connecting start and end points, red “x” = traveler, grey “x” = all possible intersection points [destinations] within 1/2 mile radius along tunnel

Grasshopper definition

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The blog, A Town Square, has been extremely valuable in introducing me to some wonderful historical information including the following series of aerial photos of the inner loop taken from 1930 to 2002.  The transformations of the urban fabric was quite drastic, especially between 1951 and 1961.

1930

1951

1961

1970

2002

I found a present day promotional video made about Rochester, except I think this one encompasses the “Greater Rochester Region.”  Is this the same Rochester I’ve been researching?

Rochester, NY: Where Smart People Live and Smart Businesses Grow

Below is the PDF presentation I used for my mid-review.  It went well and was very helpful for me.  Next steps include investigating larger infrastructural systems and potential impacts to vacancy rates in Rochester [about 10%], making and testing a proposition for the city and a few other key goals.  There will be a lot to consider and much to investigate/explore, but that’s the fun part!

The full PDF can be downloaded here:  MIDREVIEW-presentation-sm72

The underground component of the 1.5 miles of the subway is alluring, but it is just as important to familiarize ourselves with the above ground conditions. Where might potential generative armatures begin? What will they connect?  This animated route took us by at least a few parking lots and garages.  What about the vacant lots or excessively wide streets?

The field of parking lots [outlined in red and green] spread throughout downtown Rochester prompted a Grasshopper [GH] exploration on their relationships to two corridors: the abandoned subway tunnel [shorter segment] and the Genesee River [oriented north-south].

Based on the size of each parking lot [green outlines are parking garages], points are positioned from the center of each shape while its Z-value is a factor of each individual footprint.

A modified voronoi surface creates a terrain based on parking lot sizes in top and perspective views.

After creating the 3D landform, I took perpendicular sections along each corridor to describe its relationship to the distribution of parking area.  The first set of 3 images describes the conditions along the abandoned subway tunnel.

Flattening these sections would probably help illustrate more clearly the variation in area distribution or parking [potential usable] availability along the corridor.  That will be for another time.

The following 3 images are of sections along the Genesee River.

Just when you think there are too many parking lots in downtown Rochester, you find even more parking space with stacked lots.  Here is an updated diagram with the addition of parking garages [in red].  Could we use existing networks [i.e. subway, rail, river, etc] to connect these patches?

1| Clinton + Woodbury

2| Court + South

3| South btwn Main + Broad

4| Clinton + Mortimer

5| Scio + Main

6| Andrews by the Genesee River

7| Fitzhugh

8| State + Commercial

Earlier in the year, Eric Fischer gave us maps of Geotaggers’ World Atlas.  Now, he’s introduced a new series on race and ethnicity of cities across the globe.  The one below is of New York City.

_Red = White

_Blue = Black

_Green = Asian

_Orange = Hispanic

_Each dot is 25 people

_Data = Census 2000